Expressing Agreement in English

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Clare BreretonInglés
15 de noviembre de 2017
363
unos segundos
A lot of English students make mistakes when it comes to expressing agreement or disagreement with someone. Here are a few easy ways to sound more natural in conversation.



Think
A lot of students have trouble using "think" to express agreement or disagreement in conversation. Remember, we should use "so" NOT "yes" or "no".

I think so.
I don't think so.


Agree
People sometimes have trouble using "agree" because they forget that it is a verb.

*I agree.
I don't agree / I disagree.*


Guess
We use "guess" sometimes to agree when we're not always sure or convinced. We only use "guess" in positive sentences.

I guess so.


Maybe
When we're not convinced either way we can use "maybe" (or sometimes just to be polite if we don't want to offend by just saying "no").

*Maybe.
Maybe or maybe not.*
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Clare

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Inglés
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1.647
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Hello! I'm a qualified English teacher from Australia with about six years of teaching experience. I'm living in Mexico and I enjoy having conversations with students from different cultures or walks of life and asking them about their experiences and ideas. I offer conversation classes, listening classes, reading classes, grammar classes, pronunciation classes and essay correction. I also speak Spanish fluently and have an intermediate level of Japanese.
Flag
Inglés
globe
Australia
time
1.647
Inglés
Nativo
,
Español
C2
,
Japonés
B1
Hello! I'm a qualified English teacher from Australia with about six years of teaching experience. I'm living in Mexico and I enjoy having conversations with students from different cultures or walks of life and asking them about their experiences and ideas. I offer conversation classes, listening classes, reading classes, grammar classes, pronunciation classes and essay correction. I also speak Spanish fluently and have an intermediate level of Japanese.

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